The 4-Hour Workweek Fallacy

The 4-Hour Workweek Fallacy

The 4-Hour Workweek is definitely THE best business book in the world, at least in my world. It has been a #1 New York Times Best Seller, selling over 1.5 million copies, one of the 10 most highlighted books of all-time on the Amazon Kindle, right now on Amazon it has 2,191 5-star reviews and searching for “4-hour workweek review” in Google yields another 900,000 results to go through. It’s pretty safe to assume that this book has changed more lives and created more entrepreneurs in the world than any single business school to date.

However, not all of the feedback has been as positive.

Let’s face it, the title, “4-hour workweek” does sound like your stereotypical “get-rich-quick” scheme and this talk about the “new rich” doesn’t help along.

The main arguments people have against the books are in the style of:

  • You can’t make a living on 4 hours a week (talk about joining any kind of rich..)
  • Tim isn’t working 4 hours a week, what a hypocrite
  • Outsourcing is immoral, your Indians are underpaid
  • Ferriss went to Princeton and “made it” thanks to that
  • Not answering emails is rude
  • Blah blah more random excuses blah

There’s one thing all of these people have in common: they obviously haven’t read the book.

A Huge Misconception

The 4-hour workweek ISN’T about working FOUR hours a week. It’s a title, it’s meant to catch your attention, like almost any other book title. That’s how marketing works. If you’ve read the book, you know how the title was picked out as well – a simple conversion test.

Does that mean making a living or “joining the new rich” is impossible with just four hours a week? Hell no.

He demonstrates it perfectly in the book, the case studies have shown this and there are hundreds of blogs out there showing people who have done the exact same thing.

Never-the-less, that’s not what the book is about. If you’ve read it, you’d know that.

So What Is The 4-Hour Workweek About?

To sum it up, efficiency over productivity.

The concept is that the majority of your working time is being wasted doing the stuff that doesn’t matter. As by the Pareto principle, 20% of your work gets you 80% of the results. The majority of people focus on doing 100% work, instead of just the part that really matters. Sometimes even worse, they do “work for work’s sake” and never actually make it to the important part(s).

Why would you work 40 hours a week, if you could cut out the unimportant, delegate the boring, automate the easy and put in 4 hours doing the meaningful work?

How many of you actually have the self-discipline and control to actually BE PRODUCTIVE throughout those 40 hours anyway? Not many, I’d assume. Even when I do the work I love, it’s often quite clear that you only have X many hours of creative power in your mind… There’s no reason to waste more time just trying

Here are some of the key things you’ll learn from the book:

  • Not all work is equally important
  • Not all clients are equally important
  • Outsourcing isn’t only for huge corporations or millionaires
  • Micromanaging isn’t the way to go
  • There’s more to vacations/traveling then spending a week on a Thai beach
  • The magic of automation
  • You most likely have an information overload
  • You don’t need as much money as you think – for most of the things you want
  • Relative income is more important than absolute income.
  • Much, much, much more

Buy The 4-Hour Workweek

The 4-Hour Workweek

The 4-Hour Workweek

Buy The Dip Now At Amazon.com

If I could ever only recommend one book for anyone to read – it would be this one. It has the potential to drastically change your life, especially if you’re unhappy with your current situation. Check it out! 😉

The 4-Hour Workweek Fallacy Reviewed by on . The 4-Hour Workweek is definitely THE best business book in the world, at least in my world. It has been a #1 New York Times Best Seller, selling over 1.5 milli The 4-Hour Workweek is definitely THE best business book in the world, at least in my world. It has been a #1 New York Times Best Seller, selling over 1.5 milli Rating: 0

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